Staff Picks: Invincible

Dan-bigWhen it comes to superhero comics, I’m not much of a fan. I mean sure, I like Superman: Red Son and Joss Whedon’s run of Astounding X-men, but who doesn’t?

But Robert Kirkman’s Invincible is a different story. This superhero story is so good that it doesn’t feel like a superhero story. Invincible is deep and layered. It’s not just about how hard the Invincible-Collection-1heroes can hit each other, it’s also about the consequences and complex issues that so many other superhero comics overlook.  At first it starts off as your run-of-the-mill story: boy’s Dad is basically Superman, boy turns 16 and his powers kick in, boy has to balance learning to be a superhero, going to school and having a girlfriend. It all starts very innocent and feels quite familiar, but that’s just what Kirkman wants you to think. DUN DUN DUUUUUUN!

What makes Invincible different is that Kirkman owns the IP to the books’ whole universe. He is under no guidelines or rules like those often enforced by Marvel and DC. If Kirkman wants to kill off a character, he can — and he can do it anyway he sees fit — AND, get this: the character is allowed to stay dead!

The freedom Image has given Kirkman (and all the writers) is so refreshing. The story addresses many new superhero-based ideas without messing with its continuity. The story is written in a way that feels like homage to superhero comics — no, to all comics in general.

newThe first volume was drawn by Cory Walker (issues #1-7) then Ryan Ottley took over and has been doing it ever since. What I really admired about Ottley’s artwork was that he seemed to copy Walker’s drawing style, then slowly he merged into his own style. This made the change almost unnoticeable and I think the amount of skill he must have to pull that off is amazing.

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This comic rules. So if you’re not scared of the occasional violent fight I wholeheartedly recommend this series. You won’t regret it. No one has yet.